Lamb Burgers and Mango Salsa

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Lamb Burger and Mango Salsa

500g minced lamb
3 spring onions
bunch of coriander
1 ripe mango
1 green pepper
1 lime
1tsp sugar
pitta breads

Make the burgers by combining the finely chopped white part of the spring onions, the minced lamb, some chopped coriander and seasoning. Form into burger patties.

To make the salsa combine the diced flesh of the mango, the diced green pepper, the finely chopped green part of the spring onions, the sugar and the juice and zest of the lime.

I BBQ the Lamb Burgers but if you like they could be fried or grilled. Cut the Pitta Breads to form a pocket and warm on the BBQ or under the grill. Stuff a burger into the Pitta pocket and serve with the Mango Salsa.

Prawn and Sweetcorn Fritters

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Prawn and Sweetcorn Fritters

Made these tonight using the first English Sweetcorn cobs.

100g plain flour
1tsp baking powder
a pinch of smoked paprika
2 eggs
350g fresh sweetcorn kernals stripped from the cob
140g frozen prawns defrosted
6 spring onions finely chopped
1 red chilli, seeds removed, finely chopped
salt and pepper

If using fresh sweetcorn boil in salted water for 4-5 minutes then drain well. If using tinned then simply drain. Coarsely chop the prawns so that the pieces are roughly the same size as the sweetcorn kernals. Combine the chopped prawns, spring onion and chilli in a bowl. To another bowl add the flour, paprika and baking powder and seasoning. Beat the milk and eggs together, add to the flour mix whilst continuing to beat to make a thick batter which is then mixed with the solid ingredients. Fry spoonfulls of the mix in a shallow pan turning them over when they start to brown.

Bresaola

Started making Bresaola this evening. 1kg of topside trimmed of all fat and put to cure in a mix of sea salt, torn up bay leaves, crushed fresh garlic, crushed peppercorns, lemon peel, cloves, a few crushed, dried, chilli flakes and sprigs of rosemary. Will post the next stage in 5 days time – the whole process is going to take 5 or 6 weeks before tasting can begin.

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Step 1

11 May 2014 – Removed from the cure, rinsed and patted dry before marinading in a bottle of red wine.

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Step 2

17 May 2014 – Removed from the red wine marinade and patted dry. Bound with string and ready to hang up in a cool, dry, airy place.

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Step 3

1 June 2014 – The air drying process is proceeding well and fine white mould begins to appear which indicates that all is well. Compare with the very first picture to see how much the piece of beef has shrunk.

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Step 4

14 June 2014 – Ready to eat! Very finely sliced (almsot paper thin), I don’t think you could do this without a slicing machine. After taking the ‘photo I added some parmesan shavings and sprinkled on a little olive oil. Ate for lunch with a few olives and a chunk of bread.

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Sliced Bresaola

Tonka Bean Ice-Cream

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Tonka Bean Ice-Cream

In the posting describing my recent lunch at Verveine I enthused about the flavour of tonka beans. Once home I did a Google to find a supplier, waited impatiently for them to arrive and was finally able to make tonka bean ice-cream today. My immediate reaction was to describe the flavour as “the first flavour to come through is vanilla, then it evolves into something a little woody and finally homes in on cedar”. One website has this to say about them “The taste of the tonka bean is linked strongly to its scent. “Scents,” I should say, as the tonka bean has many at once. I register the aromas of vanilla, cherry, almond, and something spicy—a bit like cinnamon. When served cold—say, in tonka bean ice cream—the taste is like a vanilla caramel with dark honey. When warm, perhaps shaved over scallops, it moves toward spiced vanilla. Additionally, the aroma of the tonka bean shavings (it’s almost always shaved) is so affecting that it seems like an actual taste in the way that opium, which has no taste in the traditional sense, “tastes” like its rich, flowery smoke.”

If that’s whetted your appetite here’s how I made the Tonka Bean Ice-Cream.

1 x Tonka Bean
300ml Double Cream
300ml Full Fat Milk
3 x Yolks from large eggs
115g Sugar

I mixed the milk and cream together in a saucepan and then using a fine grater grated the tonka bean into the milk cream mix. If you don’t have a very fine grater I think a nutmeg grater would be ideal. The milk and cream mixture was heated, but not allowed to come to the boil, before putting a lid on the pan and turning off the heat. This was left for about 15 minutes to infuse before straining through a seive to remove to remove the tonke bean gratings. Beat the egg yolks and sugar together thoroughly and then pour in the milk cream mixture stirring all the time. Back on the stove to reheat again without boiling, but stirring all the time. I use a thermometer and remove the pan from the heat when it reaches 85C. Allow to cool and then use whatever method you like to make the ice-cream. Ice-cream maker or straight into a container, part freeze, remove and stir, freeze again, remove and stir etc.